Brian Roettinger: Reproductions

January 16th, 2015

The Thing Quarterly is an object based publication. Each issue is conceived of by a different contributor. The object is reproduced, wrapped, and shipped to the subscribers.
Artist and graphic designer Brian Roettinger‘s issue 25 for The Thing Quarterly, Reproductions, is a massive catalogue raisonné that collects, documents and indexes the majority of his design work produced to date. The works, which are reproduced in black and white from photocopies, are not presented chronologically, nor is it clear, upon first inspection, which project is which: an early version is shown, sometimes just a sketch, and in some cases, the final printer proofs. Unlike a traditional monograph, Roettinger’s reimagined interpretation is a testament to the process itself, and underscores the poles of his approach, which is both visibly chaotic and meticulously organized. Launch, January 30, 8.30pm, Ace Hotel, Los Angeles.

Posted in Books, Graphic Design

198 assemblages du bois / Wood joints

January 16th, 2015

198 Wood Joints (an inventory) is the first ever published compilation of wood joints technics of that size, presented in the guise of an impressive axonometric series created and realized by Elias Guenoun. The book ends with a postface by the author (an architect and architecture theoretician) depicting the origins and ambitions of the project. 198 Wood Joints is not only a useful and practical technical collection for wood workers, it is also a formal object with state of the art graphics (by the reknown French graphic designer Philippe Millot) recalling Conceptual Art series of the 70s in the US, such as Sol LeWitt cubicle permutations artworks for instance.

Posted in Architecture, Books

Le Tapis (fair use)

January 9th, 2015

Reproduction of the floor piece Le Tapis (fair use) by Pierre Leguillon, consisting of a collection of graphically striking record sleeves designed by artists, surrounded by postcards from a large variety of art institutions showing objects on a monochrome background. On the backside all sources and credits are collected as found on the originals. Printed and hand folded in an edition of 600 copies. Published on the occasion of Leguillon’s solo exhibition The Museum of Mistakes: Contemporary Art and Class Struggle at Wiels, Brussels.

Posted in Art, Books

Linus Bill and Adrien Horni installation at Printed Matter

December 4th, 2014

From December 4 to January 10, at Printed Matter in New York, Swiss artists Linus Bill and Adrien Horni will present an exhibition featuring a survey of their collaborative publications, as well as a newly-created wall piece. Stemming from their desire to challenge the perceived hierarchy of artistic mediums, their practice includes an active publishing element as well as sculptures and paintings that are often mutually-derived.
Linus Bill and Adrien Horni often begin their work together with the creation of a modest publication. The small-scale collages that make up the piece are handmade with paper, scissors and glue, as well as on copy machines, scanners, and iPhones. These ‘reproductions’ serve as a catalog for a show that does not yet exist. The artists then select works to scale up and re-create as full size canvas “paintings”, fulfilling the obligation of the Artist but in reverse.
In the case of their installation at Printed Matter they have engaged a similar set of concerns, though from another vantage point. Following the creation of a new staple-bound zine catalog, they have simply excerpted an image from the publication as a laser print collage with an added sticker. By maintaining the work’s size and giving the image a new context (now in an enormous frame), they re-assign the value of artwork and make it into something that is at once both an exemplary example of a wall-worthy artwork, and that seems to undermine that suggestion at the same time. In a concurrent exhibition at Nathalie Karg Gallery (Opening December 11), the small scale collages from the publication (and the framed piece at Printed Matter) are installed as the “original“ large scale paintings.
An additional survey of publications by Turbo Magazine, Horni’s ongoing publishing project, will also be on view as part of the installation.

Cooking With Scorsese

November 28th, 2014

Iron-cooked ham and cheese sandwiches, cailles en sarcophagi, explosive pissing beef balls; low, high, accessible, obscure, comical – food, like art, is served up in various guises, but whatever form it takes, it shares the common traits of being a stimulant as well as a necessity for living. Food and art also share a common space at the heart of Hato Press’s practice. Each day they serve up a communal afternoon meal, creating an opportunity to down tools and enjoy the moment. Now, with the book Cooking With Scorsese – a black-and-white trailer for a full colour feature to be published soon – they welcome you to join in this homage to both food, and to films that celebrate eating in all sorts of compelling ways.

Posted in Books

What, you don’t know Grapus?

November 28th, 2014

Grapus [ \gra-´pUEs] is a French graphic design collective founded in Paris immediately following the student protests of May 1968. The group saw life as a field for experimentation, putting the new political, social, and cultural debates into graphic form for public discussion. At first Grapus designed posters for local chapters of the Communist Party; twenty years on, they were chosen to design the corporate identity of the Louvre in Paris. By the late 1980s, the collective’s productive days were over. In its heyday it had attracted many highly committed graphic artists both from France and abroad. After receiving the Grand Prix National des Arts Graphiques, the group decided to disband in 1990. For the book What, you don’t know Grapus?, Léo Favier set out in search of the former members of the collective. The twenty-six interviews in his book tell of the utopian working methods and heated disputes that were at the heart of this collective way of life. Launch, December 4, 2014, 6.30pm, Le Monte-en-l’air, Paris.

Posted in Books, Graphic Design

9 to 5, a Mark Pezinger Verlag exhibition

November 24th, 2014

Mark Pezinger Verlag publishes artworks ranging from one-offs to higher editions and from books towards sound works to performances.
In the exhibition 9 to 5, December 4 to 7 at Wiels in Brussels, Mark Pezinger presents Kasper Andreasen, Thomas Geiger, Katrin Herzner, Max Leiß and Astrid Seme who work in their way of publishing with a daily routine. The publications are either produced consequently over a long duration or are a document or diary of a personal day. And even the economical backbone of the publishing house is based on the ongoing performance: I want to become a millionaire.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

Aspen Magazine: 1965–1971

November 20th, 2014

Aspen Magazine was a multimedia magazine conceived of, edited and published by Phyllis Johnson in New York from 1965 to 1971. Aspen broke new ground in terms of its editorial concept, design approach and distribution strategy, which continues to be resonant and influential today.

The magazine featured a diverse and impressive array of contributors, from such key artists, musicians, authors and theorists as Andy Warhol, Willem de Kooning, Ian Hamilton Finlay, David Hockney, Jasper Johns, Allan Kaprow, Ed Ruscha, J. G. Ballard, Bill Evans, Philip Glass, the Velvet Underground and Yoko Ono. Known as “the magazine in a box”, Aspen was made up of unbound contents that included texts, flexi-discs, reels of film and other objects. It struck a chord in the 1960s artists’ publishing culture—which included publications by Marcel Duchamp, Seth Siegelaub and members of the Fluxus movement—and embraced the idea of presenting travelling exhibitions in a book (or a box, for that matter) in order to provide alternative spaces and economies for art.

The exhibition Aspen Magazine: 1965–1971, from November 26 to February 8 2015, at Charles H. Scott Gallery, Vancouver, features complete sets of all issues, with a focus on the combined edition of issues five and six from 1967, which was guest-edited by Brian O’Doherty and is referred to as The Conceptual Issue. Contributors to this issue include Marcel Duchamp, Samuel Beckett, John Cage, Robert Rauschenberg, Hans Richter, Sol LeWitt, Mel Bochner, Naum Gabo, László Moholy-Nagy, Dan Graham, George Kubler, Robert Morris, William S. Burroughs, Roland Barthes, Susan Sontag, Alain Robbe-Grillet, Morton Feldman, Michel Butor, Tony Smith and Merce Cunningham. Barthes first published his influential and important essay The Death of the Author in this issue.

Learning to Read Art: A Surviving History of Printed Matter

November 20th, 2014

Printed Matter, a pioneer in the field of artists’ books and a nerve center for New York’s alternative arts world for four decades, is the subject of the exhibition Learn to Read Art: A Surviving History of Printed Matter at 80WSE gallery, New York, from December 2 to February 14.
A carefully selected amalgamation of books, records, exhibition documentation and flyers, the exhibition charts the organizational history of the New York non-profit in relation to the history of artists’ books and important movements in contemporary art from the 70’s to the present, encompassing the alternative space movement, downtown NYC counter-cultural scenes, and artist activism.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

< o > future < o >

November 9th, 2014

< o > future < o > is conceived by François Aubart, Jérôme Dupeyrat, Charles Mazé, Camille Pageard, and Coline Sunier. < o > future < o > continues and enhances the activities of Pyramide, Diapason, Roue crantée with online and printed publications. It is part of the activities of Bat.

Posted in Art, Books

The Liberated Page

November 9th, 2014

The recent evolution and democratisation of printing techniques has encouraged many artists to re-evaluate their position in relation to literature, to books, and to the page. Dedicated to the exploration of new practices within art book production, The Liberated Page will consider the page for its simultaneously poetic, structural and physical elements.

From November 21 to December 28 2014, Bâtiment d’art contemporain, Le Commun, in Geneva, the exhibition will highlight a wide range of interventions and approaches, and will discuss in particular, how artists invent new books and why their invention opens up new possibilities for the page – as well as for communication and language.
The Liberated Page will highlight the work of several contemporary artists concerned with the page, in conversation with such historic examples as books from artists Dieter Roth, Edward Ruscha, and Seth Siegelaub, bookworks from publishing houses Something Else Press and Ecart (including work by Daniel Spoerri, Robert Fillou, Emmett Williams, and Dick Higgins), an anthology by Guy Schraenen, the Mèla post card book from Maurizio Nannucci, as well as the complete Franklin Furnace archive.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

Offprint Paris 2014

November 4th, 2014

Offprint Paris, November 14-16, 2014, Beaux-arts de Paris, is an art-publishing fair featuring discerning publishers on art, photography, design and experimental music labels. This year’s edition showcases more than 130 publishers, from over 20 countries (all participants now announced on the website), selected by Yannick Bouillis, Charlotte Cheetham and Maxime Guitton.

Zeitungsfotos – Newspaper Photographs by Thomas Ruff

November 3rd, 2014


© Hatje Cantz

Best known for his oversized, dead-pan portraits, his unmediated shots of commonplace interiors, and his seemingly straightforward photographs of architecture, Thomas Ruff has quietly approached many familiar genres, and proceeded to discreetly reinvent them.
For his Zeitungsfotos (Newspaper Photographs) series, Ruff found images in newspapers, and then re-photographed and enlarged them to isolate the photographs from the text, allowing Ruff’s viewer, now no longer a reader, to make assumptions about the photograph without any information to support the viewer’s inferences.
The book Zeitungsfotos – Newspaper Photographs consists of 400 reproductions from German newspapers that Ruff collected over the span of 10 years (1981–1991).

Posted in Books, Photography

The Line / Types of Architecture / Shores of the Mediterranean / Cities of Italy – Saul Steinberg

October 24th, 2014

On the occasion of the exhibition Architecture by Line in Lausanne, an artist’s book has been published by Nieves and brings together for the first time, as individual leporellos, the four long drawings Saul Steinberg produced for the Children’s Labyrinth, a spiraling, trefoil wall structure at 10th Triennial of Milan, a design and architecture fair that opened in August 1954. The drawings were photographically enlarged and incised into the wall.

The Line, which begins and ends with a hand drawing, is Steinberg’s manifesto about the conceptual possibilities of the line and the artist who gives them life. As the horizontal line shifts meaning from one passage to the next—water line, laundry line, railroad track, among others—it comments on its own transformative nature. The Line occupied one of the structure’s three leaves, while the other two hosted Types of Architecture, Shores of the Mediterranean, and Cities of Italy.
Types of Architecture is a satirical survey of world architecture (Steinberg was trained as an architect in Milan), from America’s log cabins to Bauhaus exaggerations to fragile skyscrapers.
Shores of the Mediterranean presents a sailor’s-eye-view of the Mediterranean coastline, filled with the ruins and renascences of successive civilizations.
The Italy Steinberg knew as a student in the 1930s resonates in Cities of Italy, as the inked line, drawn with the artist’s usual spare elegance, imagines an urban sprawl of campaniles, factories, piazzas, apartment houses, curlicued domes, and a water tank that seems to have escaped from a carnival.

Strange Design

October 17th, 2014

Depuis quelques années ont fait leur apparition dans le monde du design des objets étranges : des objets dysfonctionnels, énigmatiques, compliqués. Ces objets relévent d’une posture que les designers anglais Anthony Dunne et Fiona Raby ont défini Critical Design (design critique) : un design spéculatif, réflexif, qui ne veut pas proposer des solutions, mais plutôt poser des questions, qui veut défier les affirmations rapides, les préjugés et lieux communs sur le rôle des produits dans la vie de tous les jours. Un design qui ne se veut pas affirmatif, c’est-à-dire soumis aux impératifs des systèmes de pouvoir, mais au contraire critique. Cette “attitude” n’est pas nouvelle, mais a, au contraire, une histoire, qui longe la frontière entre art et design.
L’objectif de Strange Design — du design des objets au design des comportements n’est pas de reparcourir cette histoire de manière exhaustive ou linéaire, mais plutôt d’en envisager quelques épisodes afin de dégager les outils critiques dont ils sont porteurs pour l’histoire du design ­— comme une sismographie qui indique les résurgences de la crise d’un modèle.
Rencontre et signature le 21 octobre, dès 18h30, au Lieu du design à Paris.

Posted in Books, Design

Pie Paper #5 “The food issue”

October 13th, 2014

Pie Paper is a non periodical publication which has been designed to inspire, entertain and inform. Pie Paper #5 is titled “The food issue”. Our connections to food are multifarious and complex, with many of our ideas about food taken for granted. Why for instance are we happy to drink the milk of a cow, but shy away at the thought of nibbling on human cheese? What compels us to eat potato chips instead of nutritionally superior deep fried cockroaches? And why do some people prefer mouthfuls of wet clay and metal over real food? … Among others in this issue, the Italian Futurists could help you to broaden your horizon, Buckminster Fuller explains the smart way to play with your food, Werner Herzog will show you how to boil your boot, and the Whole Roasted Camel could keep you and your family fed for a while.

Posted in Periodicals

One Hand, and the Other

October 9th, 2014

One Hand, and the Other, a book by Emil Salto, published by Cornerkiosk press.
There’s a hand and there’s another and then there is the other. Echoes of year-old sunlight exposing hand gestures, a soft shadow against changing background, and a brilliant rectangle entering the frame and fixating the narrative.

Posted in Art, Books

Pensée Nomade, Chose Imprimée

October 3rd, 2014

October 4, from 6pm at castillo/corrales, Paris, on the occasion of the release of PNCI, Pensée Nomade Chose Imprimée (1989-2013), Michel Aphesbero and Danielle Colomine, the artist duo behind the legendary magazine 4 Taxis, and the non-less legendary studio Pensée Nomade Chose Imprimée that they organized with Jean Calens at the Bordeaux School of Fine Arts, will put together a small exhibition made of archival footage, publications and paraphernalia from the 25 history of the most Situationnist and punk-rock teaching experiment ever conducted.

Posted in Art, Books, Education

Sturtevant: Double Trouble

October 2nd, 2014


Sturtevant. Haring Tag July 15 1981. 1985

Sturtevant (American, 1924–2014) has been “repeating” the works of her contemporaries since 1964, using some of the most iconic artworks of her generation as a source and catalyst for the exploration of originality, authorship, and the interior structures of art and image culture. Beginning with her versions of works by Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol, Sturtevant initially turned the visual logic of Pop art back on itself, probing uncomfortably at the workings of art history in real time. Yet her chameleon-like embrace of other artists’ art has also resulted in her being largely overlooked in the history of postwar American art. As a woman making versions of the work of better-known male artists, she has passed almost unnoticed through the hierarchies of mid-century modernism and postmodernism, at once absent from these histories while nevertheless articulating their structures.
Though her work of the 1960s and 1970s may appear to be simply mimetic exercises in proto-appropriation, Sturtevant is better understood as an artist who adopts style as her medium and takes the art of her time as a loose “score” to be enacted. Far more than copies, her versions of Johns’s flags, Warhol’s flowers, and Joseph Beuys’s fat chairs are studies in the action of art that expose aspects of its making, circulation, and canonization. Working primarily in video since 2000, the artist remains deeply engaged with the politics of image production and reception, using stock footage from Hollywood films, television, and advertising to point to the exhaustion built into much of postwar cultural production.

The exhibition Sturtevant: Double Trouble, from November 9, 2014, to February 22, 2015, at MoMA, New York, is the first comprehensive survey in America of Sturtevant’s 50-year career, and the only institutional presentation of her work organized in the United States since her solo show at the Everson Museum of Art in 1973. Rather than taking the form of a traditional retrospective, the exhibition offers a historical overview of her work from a contemporary vantage point, interspersing more recent video pieces among key artworks from all periods of her career.


Sturtevant. Study for Muybridge Plate #97: Woman Walking. 1966

Posted in Art, Exhibitions

Ray Johnson @ Karma

October 2nd, 2014

American popular culture and the environment of the “art world,” combined with a sly use of puns, codes, inside jokes and signature wit mixed with piercing perceptiveness, comprise the frame for much of Ray Johnson‘s work. Using his own brand of semantic structure, Ray Johnson creates complex and multi-layered portraits—of himself and of other subjects.
From October 7 to November 1, 2014, Karma, New York, presents an exhibition of previously unseen work by Ray Johnson. A comprehensive publication will be released in conjunction with the exhibition, which includes 296 color illustrations of collages, drawings, interventions and other ephemera.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

« Previous Next »