Full/Operational/Toolbox

The exhibition Full/Operational/Toolbox, curated by KERNEL, intends to investigate a range of contemporary artistic practices that negotiate the ways of management and distribution of information in the context of the creative process.

(…) Collecting works that represent different approaches and intentions, Full/Operational/Toolbox doesn’t start from a given ideological incitement or fixed point of reference. It intends to communicate and highlight those artistic practices that reassess the relations between the expert and the amateur, functioning in a inspirational and educative manner that opens up to comprehensive and dynamic creative processes and possibilities. The works to be presented in Full/Operational/Toolbox highlight and realize, each one in its own way and using its own codes, ideas and creative strategies that concern the management of the artistic work mainly as “information”. The works, thus, set out new conditions for the access and distribution of culture and of the viewer’s participation in it.
Exploring the dynamics and the status of these creative activities, Full/Operational/Toolbox, aims at functioning as a platform of debate on the ways of management of the cultural product in terms of directness and immediacy, as well as on the reconsideration of material and institutional processes and limitations.

With Otto von Busch, Forms of Melancholy curated by Chris Coy, Aleksandra Domanovic, Seth Price, Let’s Remake, Dexter Sinister, Damon Zucconi

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Index of Potential
The on-going project Index of Potential, an on-line “library” of texts and titles related to the ideas and issues proposed by Full/Operational/Toolbox operates in the same context. In the exhibition, a part of this digital library will be realized with the assistance of KERNEL’s construction structure, including digital printings of texts, lists of titles as well as original publications borrowed by the participants.

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14 May – 30 May 2010
Temporary project space M21, Athens, Greece

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