Take me (I’m Yours)

Take Me (I’m Yours) is a collective and interactive exhibition which brings together the work of forty-four international artists under the curatorship of Christian Boltanski, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Chiara Parisi. The exhibition, from September 16 to November 8, will turn the Monnaie de Paris’s 18th-century rooms into a venue for free and creative exchange, designed to unsettle the conventional relationship between a work of art and its viewer. Visitors are invited, even encouraged, to touch, use and take away the artists’ projects and ideas.
The exhibition curators, Christian Boltanski and Hans Ulrich Obrist, have taken the original principle which motivated them in 1995 at the Serpentine Gallery and brought it up to date.
With more than forty projects, the Paris exhibition is greater in magnitude and scope. The project sees the return of artists who took part in the first event (Christian Boltanski, Maria Eichhorn, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Jef Geys, Gilbert & George, Douglas Gordon, Christine Hill, Carsten Höller, Fabrice Hyber, Wolfgang Tillmans, Lawrence Weiner and Franz West), and has given rise to new collaborations (Etel Adnan & Simone Fattal, Pawel Althamer, Kerstin Brätsch & Sarah Ortmeyer, James Lee Byars, Heman Chong, Jeremy Deller, Andrea Fraser, Gloria Friedmann, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Bertrand Lavier, Jonathan Horowitz, Koo Jeong-A, Alison Knowles, Angelika Markul, Gustav Metzger, Otobong Nkanga, Roman Ondák, Yoko Ono, Philippe Parreno, Sean Raspet, Takako Saito, Daniel Spoerri, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Amalia Ulman, Franco Vaccari, Danh Võ and the artists Ho Rui An, Felix Gaudlitz and Charlie Malgat from 89plus, the multiplatform international research project designed to map the generation born on and after 1989 by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Simon Castets. The exhibition is also an outlet for distributing issues of point d’ironie (agnès b.).
Displayed on the walls of the last factory in the centre of Paris, the exhibition is an opportunity to revisit the myth of the unique artwork and question its methods of production.

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