STEINBERG, SAUL. THE NEW YORKER. NEW YORK, 1945–2000. (HAROLD, WILLIAM, ROBERT, TINA, DAVID, EDS.)

STEINBERG, SAUL. THE NEW YORKER. NEW YORK, 1945–2000.
(HAROLD, WILLIAM, ROBERT, TINA, DAVID, EDS.)

For more than fifty years, Saul Steinberg was The New Yorker’s in-house observer, visual epitome, and its chief cartoonist. This exhibition, naming The New Yorker’s consecutive editors, collects some two hundred of his one thousand published contributions, presented as is: magazines, collected through time, some slightly yellowed and hung with that irrevocable library smell…

We can’t imagine how you could see Steinberg’s stenographic line without seeing the page it is on. “Everything has a message,” Steinberg noted. The circulatory system has a message, the page has a message, the ads have a message, the neighborhood of fiction and news have a message, all of it makes for juxtapositions as eerily apposite as anything the French surrealists or a blender could come up with.

The exhibition program will include a lecture by the exhibition coordinators Robert Snowden and Scott Ponik, a talk by Stuart Bailey of Dexter Sinister on July 3, and a screening of The Right Way by Fischli and Weiss on Saturday, August 4.

June 16 – August 10, 2012
YALE UNION (YU), Portland

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