Fiona Banner – SCROLL DOWN AND KEEP SCROLLING & FONT

August 31st, 2015

Scroll down and keep scrolling – October 10, 2015, to January 17, 2016, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham – is the most comprehensive exhibition of Fiona Banner’s work to date, re-presenting key early projects alongside recent and unseen works that span a period of 25 years. “It is not a survey – more of an anti-survey,” says the artist, “A survey suggests something objective, historical, and fixed. This is subjective; nothing else is possible.” Throughout the exhibition Banner revisits her work with intensity and humor.

Publishing is central to Banner’s practice and she often produces books through her own imprint The Vanity Press. For the artist the act of publishing is itself performative, and this exhibition at Ikon will display a wide archive of previously unseen publications and ephemera. In addition, the artist will also publish a major new book to accompany the exhibition, typeset in a new font created by the artist and entitled Font. Font is an amalgamation of typefaces Banner has worked with previously, and will be used throughout the museum for the duration of Banner’s show.

From September 18 to October 31, 2015, Font will also be on view at Frith Street Gallery in London, and will be available to download on www.fionabanner.com from 17 September.

No Reading No Cry!

August 24th, 2015

No Reading No Cry! – September 5 to 30, 2015, Open Graphic Art Studio – Museum of the City of Skopje, Macedonia – is an exhibtion curated by Mark Pezinger Verlag with Darko Aleksvoski, Felicia Atkinson, Andrew Gannon, Romain Gandolphe, Katrin Herzner, Florence Jung, Florian Köhler, Mikko Kuorinki, Darko Petrusev, Astrid Seme, Yann Vanderme and the Macedonian Artists’ Books Library*

“I’m never stocking them again, never! It’s been bedlam! I thought we’d seen the worst when we bought two hundred copies of the Invisible Book of Invisibility. Cost a fortune, and we never found them.“ This is how the manager of Flourish and Blotts, the bookstore in the book/film “Harry Potter” complains about the “Invisible Book of Invisibility”. This book about the power of invisibility is itself, of course, invisible. As manager of a bookstore invisibility is indeed frustrating, but from an artist’s perspective invisibility can encourage the viewer to re-imagine how we engage presence, memories or documentation. Following this idea Mark Pezinger Verlag brings 11 artists together that work along the margins of what a book is, how the book and its content disappear and when it can only be visualized through imagination.

As a physical counterpart to the exhibition the Macedonian Artists’ Books Library brings together artist’s books from various publishers that are normally hard to be accessible in Macedonia. With 1:1, 1%ofOne Verlag, Back Bone Books, Ben K. Voss, Black Pages, BoaBooks, Edition Fink, Edition Taube, FuckingGoodArt, Gloria Glitzer, Harpune Verlag, Good Press Gallery, Humboldt Books, Kodoji Press, La Houle, Michalis Pichler Unlimited, More Publisher, Nieves, Section7Books, Sergej Vutuc, Shelter Press and Soybot.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

Corita Kent and the Language of Pop

August 19th, 2015

Corita Kent was an activist nun who juxtaposed spiritual, pop cultural, literary, and political writings alongside symbols of consumer culture and modern life in order to create bold images and prints during the 1960s. Also known as Sister Mary Corita, Kent is often seen as a curiosity or an “anomaly” in the pop art movement.
Corita Kent and the Language of Pop – September 3 to January 3, 2016 at Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, and February 13 to May 8, 2016, at San Antonio Museum of Art – positions Kent and her work within the pop art idiom, showing how she is an innovative contemporary of Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, and other pop art icons. The exhibition also expands the current scholarship on Kent’s art, elevating the role of her artwork by identifying its place in the artistic and cultural movements of her time.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions

Fantastic Architecture: facsimile edition

August 19th, 2015

Primary Information is reprinting the seminal book, Fantastic Architecture, making the book widely available for the first time since it was originally published: first in 1969 by Droste Verlag in German (with the title Pop Architektur) and later in 1970 by Something Else Press as Fantastic Architecture.

Edited by Dick Higgins and Wolf Vostell, this artist’s book/anthology includes diverse contributions from a range of influential artists and architects of the 60s era addressing utopian architecture, public sculpture, and common space. Higgins and Vostell’s deft approach and design made Fantastic Architecture one of the iconic artist publications of its time. Using vellum pages for their editorial captions, Higgins and Vostell allowed the spreads by each artist to flow untouched, creating a visual page turner that eschews didactic explanation and reductionism in favor of a miasma of text, image, and material intervention that demands the reader experience the book as its being read.

Taken as a whole, the publication showcases broad concerns and approaches to architecture and public sculpture at a time when attitudes towards both were changing to reflect the political and economic concerns of the time.

Contributors include Ay-O, Joseph Beuys, Pol Bury, Eric Buchholz, John Cage, Philip Corner, Jan Dibbets, Robert Filliou, Buckminster Fuller, Raoul Hausmann, Richard Hamilton, Michael Heizer, Bici Hendricks, Geoffrey Hendricks, Jan Herman, Dick Higgins, K.H. Hoedicke, Hans Hollein, Douglas Huebler, Milan Knizak, Addi Koepcke, Alison Knowles, Franz Mon, Claes Oldenburg, Dennis Oppenheim, Dieter Roth, Gerhard Rühm, Carolee Schneemann, Kurt Schwitters, Daniel Spoerri, Frances Starr, Jean Tinguely, Lawrence Weiner, Ben Vautier, Wolf Vostell, and Stefan Wewerka.

Posted in Architecture, Books