The Line / Types of Architecture / Shores of the Mediterranean / Cities of Italy – Saul Steinberg

October 24th, 2014

On the occasion of the exhibition Architecture by Line in Lausanne, an artist’s book has been published by Nieves and brings together for the first time, as individual leporellos, the four long drawings Saul Steinberg produced for the Children’s Labyrinth, a spiraling, trefoil wall structure at 10th Triennial of Milan, a design and architecture fair that opened in August 1954. The drawings were photographically enlarged and incised into the wall.

The Line, which begins and ends with a hand drawing, is Steinberg’s manifesto about the conceptual possibilities of the line and the artist who gives them life. As the horizontal line shifts meaning from one passage to the next—water line, laundry line, railroad track, among others—it comments on its own transformative nature. The Line occupied one of the structure’s three leaves, while the other two hosted Types of Architecture, Shores of the Mediterranean, and Cities of Italy.
Types of Architecture is a satirical survey of world architecture (Steinberg was trained as an architect in Milan), from America’s log cabins to Bauhaus exaggerations to fragile skyscrapers.
Shores of the Mediterranean presents a sailor’s-eye-view of the Mediterranean coastline, filled with the ruins and renascences of successive civilizations.
The Italy Steinberg knew as a student in the 1930s resonates in Cities of Italy, as the inked line, drawn with the artist’s usual spare elegance, imagines an urban sprawl of campaniles, factories, piazzas, apartment houses, curlicued domes, and a water tank that seems to have escaped from a carnival.

Strange Design

October 17th, 2014

Depuis quelques années ont fait leur apparition dans le monde du design des objets étranges : des objets dysfonctionnels, énigmatiques, compliqués. Ces objets relévent d’une posture que les designers anglais Anthony Dunne et Fiona Raby ont défini Critical Design (design critique) : un design spéculatif, réflexif, qui ne veut pas proposer des solutions, mais plutôt poser des questions, qui veut défier les affirmations rapides, les préjugés et lieux communs sur le rôle des produits dans la vie de tous les jours. Un design qui ne se veut pas affirmatif, c’est-à-dire soumis aux impératifs des systèmes de pouvoir, mais au contraire critique. Cette “attitude” n’est pas nouvelle, mais a, au contraire, une histoire, qui longe la frontière entre art et design.
L’objectif de Strange Design — du design des objets au design des comportements n’est pas de reparcourir cette histoire de manière exhaustive ou linéaire, mais plutôt d’en envisager quelques épisodes afin de dégager les outils critiques dont ils sont porteurs pour l’histoire du design ­— comme une sismographie qui indique les résurgences de la crise d’un modèle.
Rencontre et signature le 21 octobre, dès 18h30, au Lieu du design à Paris.

Posted in Books, Design

Pie Paper #5 “The food issue”

October 13th, 2014

Pie Paper is a non periodical publication which has been designed to inspire, entertain and inform. Pie Paper #5 is titled “The food issue”. Our connections to food are multifarious and complex, with many of our ideas about food taken for granted. Why for instance are we happy to drink the milk of a cow, but shy away at the thought of nibbling on human cheese? What compels us to eat potato chips instead of nutritionally superior deep fried cockroaches? And why do some people prefer mouthfuls of wet clay and metal over real food? … Among others in this issue, the Italian Futurists could help you to broaden your horizon, Buckminster Fuller explains the smart way to play with your food, Werner Herzog will show you how to boil your boot, and the Whole Roasted Camel could keep you and your family fed for a while.

Posted in Periodicals

One Hand, and the Other

October 9th, 2014

One Hand, and the Other, a book by Emil Salto, published by Cornerkiosk press.
There’s a hand and there’s another and then there is the other. Echoes of year-old sunlight exposing hand gestures, a soft shadow against changing background, and a brilliant rectangle entering the frame and fixating the narrative.

Posted in Art, Books

Pensée Nomade, Chose Imprimée

October 3rd, 2014

October 4, from 6pm at castillo/corrales, Paris, on the occasion of the release of PNCI, Pensée Nomade Chose Imprimée (1989-2013), Michel Aphesbero and Danielle Colomine, the artist duo behind the legendary magazine 4 Taxis, and the non-less legendary studio Pensée Nomade Chose Imprimée that they organized with Jean Calens at the Bordeaux School of Fine Arts, will put together a small exhibition made of archival footage, publications and paraphernalia from the 25 history of the most Situationnist and punk-rock teaching experiment ever conducted.

Posted in Art, Books, Education

Sturtevant: Double Trouble

October 2nd, 2014


Sturtevant. Haring Tag July 15 1981. 1985

Sturtevant (American, 1924–2014) has been “repeating” the works of her contemporaries since 1964, using some of the most iconic artworks of her generation as a source and catalyst for the exploration of originality, authorship, and the interior structures of art and image culture. Beginning with her versions of works by Jasper Johns and Andy Warhol, Sturtevant initially turned the visual logic of Pop art back on itself, probing uncomfortably at the workings of art history in real time. Yet her chameleon-like embrace of other artists’ art has also resulted in her being largely overlooked in the history of postwar American art. As a woman making versions of the work of better-known male artists, she has passed almost unnoticed through the hierarchies of mid-century modernism and postmodernism, at once absent from these histories while nevertheless articulating their structures.
Though her work of the 1960s and 1970s may appear to be simply mimetic exercises in proto-appropriation, Sturtevant is better understood as an artist who adopts style as her medium and takes the art of her time as a loose “score” to be enacted. Far more than copies, her versions of Johns’s flags, Warhol’s flowers, and Joseph Beuys’s fat chairs are studies in the action of art that expose aspects of its making, circulation, and canonization. Working primarily in video since 2000, the artist remains deeply engaged with the politics of image production and reception, using stock footage from Hollywood films, television, and advertising to point to the exhaustion built into much of postwar cultural production.

The exhibition Sturtevant: Double Trouble, from November 9, 2014, to February 22, 2015, at MoMA, New York, is the first comprehensive survey in America of Sturtevant’s 50-year career, and the only institutional presentation of her work organized in the United States since her solo show at the Everson Museum of Art in 1973. Rather than taking the form of a traditional retrospective, the exhibition offers a historical overview of her work from a contemporary vantage point, interspersing more recent video pieces among key artworks from all periods of her career.


Sturtevant. Study for Muybridge Plate #97: Woman Walking. 1966

Posted in Art, Exhibitions

Ray Johnson @ Karma

October 2nd, 2014

American popular culture and the environment of the “art world,” combined with a sly use of puns, codes, inside jokes and signature wit mixed with piercing perceptiveness, comprise the frame for much of Ray Johnson‘s work. Using his own brand of semantic structure, Ray Johnson creates complex and multi-layered portraits—of himself and of other subjects.
From October 7 to November 1, 2014, Karma, New York, presents an exhibition of previously unseen work by Ray Johnson. A comprehensive publication will be released in conjunction with the exhibition, which includes 296 color illustrations of collages, drawings, interventions and other ephemera.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

Shooting Space

October 2nd, 2014

Since the invention of photography, architecture has proved a worthy subject for photographers and, in turn, photography has played an important role in how architecture is communicated. Shooting Space: Architecture in Contemporary Photography, a book by Elias Redstone, examines a critical relationship between the two practices today through the work of fifty international well known and emerging artists: Annie Leibovitz captures the construction of Renzo Piano’s New York Times building; James Welling revisits Philip Johnson’s iconic Glass House; Walter Niedermayr shifts perspectives on SANAA’s sculptural designs; and Thomas Ruff tests the limits of Mies van der Rohe’s geometries…
Divided into five chapters, the book covers collaborations between photographer and architect, global urbanization, alterations to the natural landscape, reappraised Modernist icons, and imagined environments. Presenting a unique study of outstanding work in contemporary architectural photography, Shooting Space not only offers an exciting survey of photographers at the intersection of two genres, but will reward the reader with a considered survey of our built environment.
Book launches, October 9, from 6pm, at Yvon Lambert Bookshop in Paris, and October 20, from 6pm, at Bookmarc in Los Angeles.