Kunstkammer (soon)

December 31st, 2010





«Kunstkammer, Représentation d’un cabinet d’amateur»
une exposition Manystuff
28 janvier – 25 mars 2011
galerie 12MAIL, Paris
> Dossier de presse

«Kunstkammer, The representation of an amateur cabinet of art»
a Manystuff exhibition
January 28 – March 25, 2011
12MAIL gallery, Paris
> Press release

Twice Removed

December 30th, 2010





TWICE REMOVED: A SURVEY OF TAKE AWAY WORK

Encountering the “take away” artwork, consisting of unlimited or large-run editions whose individual pieces are free for the taking, has become a common occurrence in contemporary art exhibitions. A strategy notably employed in Félix González-Torres’ “stack” works, the take away has been used by many other artists with a variety of intents and forms. The spirit of generosity, an exploration of dispersion and the attempt to circumvent the art market are just a few of the potential motivations cited for generating take away works. Twice Removed aims to provide a venue where the multiplicity of meanings and post-exhibition life implied by the take away model can be considered by exhibiting single units of these works together.

The project will take form as an exhibition, website and pamphlet to be published by Golden Age at the conclusion of the show.

Golden Age is soliciting individual pieces of take away artworks from personal collections for temporary loan during the length of the exhibition.

Contribution until January 18, 2011
Exhibition January 28 – March 6, 2011
Golden Age, Chicago

Posted in Art

AA BRONSON: MY LIFE IN BOOKS

December 30th, 2010

A TALK by AA BRONSON: MY LIFE IN BOOKS

BAS is an artist run space in Istanbul initiated by Banu Cenneto?lu where artists’ books and publications are collected, displayed and produced. Since December 2009, BAS is developing a series of talks and exhibitions in order to focus on the historical and critical context of artists’ books and printed matter.
As the forth event of this series, BAS is very pleased and proud to host AA Bronson, an artist and a healer from New York City.

From 1969 through 1994 AA Bronson lived and worked as one of three artists who together formed the group General Idea, dividing his time between Toronto and New York. For 25 years they published a continuous stream of more than 300 low-cost multiples and publications. From 1972 through 1989 they published the artists’ magazine FILE, and in 1974 they founded Art Metropole, a distribution center and archive for artists’ books.

Since his partner’s deaths in 1994, AA Bronson has worked under his own name, focusing on themes of death, healing, transformation, and social justice. His solo exhibitions have included the Vienna Secession, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, and the Power Plant, Toronto.

As the director of Printed Matter from 2004 to 2010, AA Bronson greatly expanded the activities of this centre for artists’ books in New York. He founded the NY Art Book Fair in 2006. He has also curated many exhibitions, especially of artists’ books and other democratic editions. His exhibition “Queer Zines” was presented at the 2008 NY Art Book Fair and traveled from there to OCA in Oslo.

At My Life in Books, AA will talk about the publications by General Idea, FILE magazine, Art Metropole and his recent experiences at Printed Matter, inc.

January 13, 2011, 6pm
Cezayir, Istanbul

Posted in Art

Buchgestaltung in St. Gallen

December 30th, 2010

Book design in St Gallen exhibition
For the last 60 years the significance of creating beautiful books played an important role in the swiss town St.Gallen. The exhibition features an overview of these book designs.

January 6th, 2011, 5pm
Opening & presentation by typographer and book designer Jost Hochuli
January 7th, 2011, 4pm & 5pm
Guided tour with Jost Hochuli
Panel discussion with Roland Früh, Jost Hochuli, Roland Stieger, Gaston Isoz.

Exhibition January 4-22, 2011
Weißensee Kunsthochschule, Berlin

Posted in Graphic Design

Penser l’image – Rencontre

December 29th, 2010

Penser l’image

Une anthologie de textes de philosophes, de théoriciens et d’historiens de l’art (Boehm, Mondzain, Nancy, Coccia, Alloa, Belting, Bredekamp, Mitchell, Rancière, Didi-Huberman) qui témoignent à la fois de l’incidence de la question de l’image, de sa logique spécifique et de la transformation du champ visuel dans les savoirs contemporains, et de la variété de ses approches conceptuelles, de la préhistoire à nos jours et dans différentes traditions de pensée.

Qu’est-ce qu’une image ? La multiplication proliférante des images semble bien – et c’est là son paradoxe – inversement proportionnelle à notre faculté de dire ce qu’est réellement une image. Si notre interaction quotidienne avec les écrans a fait disparaître certaines peurs archaïques quant au pouvoir perturbateur des images, cette normalisation des rapports fait elle-même écran à une confrontation réelle avec l’efficace des images.
Prenant acte du fait que l’image n’est pas structurée comme un langage, cet ouvrage se fait le témoin des débats actuels autour des logiques imaginales, notamment les Bildwissenschaften allemandes ainsi que les visual studies aux Etats-Unis. Que ce soit à partir d’une perspective contemporaine ou encore depuis une position délibérément anachronique, les différents essais forment ensemble un arsenal conceptuel permettant d’affronter de façon nouvelle la question de l’image et de son efficace.

Rencontre avec Emmanuel Alloa
6 janvier 2011, 19h00
Jeu de Paume, Paris

Posted in Art

The Kingsboro Press Issue 7 – Funding

December 29th, 2010





The Kingsboro Press Issue 7 – Funding

Founded in 2007 in Brooklyn, Kingsboro is a critical and engaged look at young art, design, and literature.

“Kingsboro is ad free and has, until now, remained totally self-funded. Curating around an independent production model is vital to the critical rigorousness of our work. In addition to fostering a close knit circle of creative like-minded friends and colleagues, we are filling a void for new, independent production methods, and providing a much, much needed outlet for innovative, young work. We approach every new issue as an artists print or unique edition, an entirely self-produced object with its own inherent visual language.”

“Issue 7 will be a groundbreaking new issue for us in both length and format. Over 100 pages in top quality content, and our first foray into using a professional printer to produce a full cover, hardbound journal with room for silkscreened and Riso-printed hand interventions”

All funds raised on Kickstarter will go directly to produce issue 7 of the Kingsboro Press.

Posted in Art, Design, Graphic Design

mrcrdsgn: Fanette Mellier

December 28th, 2010

mrcrdsgn conférence: Fanette Mellier

Cette conférence sera l’occasion de présenter les travaux graphiques récents, issus de commandes ou de cartes blanches. La couleur y joue un rôle fondamental, en terme de fonctionnalité et d’exploration plastique. La phase d’impression (offset ou sérigraphie) y revet souvent une dimension expérimentale et permet d’aborder différentes questions, liées à la temporalité, la matière ou l’aléatoire…

12 janvier 2011, 18h30
Université Paris 8, Saint-Denis

Posted in Graphic Design

LES ÉTATS DU LIVRE

December 28th, 2010





EXPOSITION “LES ÉTATS DU LIVRE”

“…Soixante-neuf livres d’étudiants. Rares. Uniques. Composés « à la main et au plomb », avec ou sans ordinateur, avec les deux, souvent. Des petits et des grands, des gros et des minces, des tendres et des durs, des drôles et des tristes, des pauvres et des riches, des gris et des gris, des noirs et des blancs, tout un monde. Tirés à part, à quatre épingles pour vous et à quelques exemplaires seulement. Parfois unique et seul, accompagnés quelquefois, ou en collection.
Livres d’auteur, d’artiste, de graphiste, de peintre, d’étudiants de Rennes et de Lorient qui ont quelque chose à dire sur ce support malmené, sur ce « livre concurrencé » et qui résiste si bien face aux nouveaux médias…”

11 Janvier – 18 Février 2011
Galerie du Cloître, Ecole des Beaux-Arts, Rennes

Posted in Art, Graphic Design

PA/PER VIEW

December 28th, 2010

IIDKWIGBITWTBT SYMPOSIUM – VIDEOS

December 23rd, 2010

I don’t know where I’m going but I want to be there
The expanding field of Graphic Design
all symposium videos here

Posted in Graphic Design

20/20: Editorial Takes on Architectural Discourse (soon)

December 23rd, 2010





20/20: Editorial Takes on Architectural Discourse brings together editors from 20 leading contemporary architectural magazines to discuss collectively the role editors play in shaping architectural discourse.
Each of the contributors has responded to a set of 20 questions on the multiple conditions under which particular ideas and words enter architectural discourse through publication. The resulting critical positions and observations are as diverse as the magazines from which they originate, and range from the oldest student-edited journal (Perspecta) to a research collective that at the time of writing was on the cusp of being launched ([bracket]). Also included are contributions from the editors of 306090, AA Files, Actar, An Architektur, Footprint, Grey Room, Harvard Design Magazine, Hunch, Interstices, Log, Manifold, Mark, New Geographies, OASE, Praxis, Scapes, UME and Volume.
20/20 is a timely publication that provides today’s architectural reader with concise viewpoints from the editors behind the magazines behind architectural culture.

Posted in Architecture

Marius Lundgård

December 23rd, 2010

Marius Lundgård

Posted in Graphic Design

Beyond the Dust – Artists’ Documents Today

December 21st, 2010





Beyond the Dust – Artists’ Documents Today propose une réflexion théorique sur l’utilisation et la manipulation des formes, des images et des textes par les artistes, qui par leur recherche questionnent les contenus liés aux considérations aussi bien philosophiques, que politiques et sociales. En intervenant sur des matériels d’archive, les artistes se rapprochent de thèmes spécifiques, dont les composantes peuvent être déjà porteuses, mais ils engendrent aussi une considération plus large sur le sens contemporain de la mémoire, de la vérité, de la fiction et du mensonge.

Beyond the Dust – Artists’ Documents Today provides the public with a theoretical hypothesis on the use and manipulation of forms, images and texts by artists. The objective is to highlight the formal implications of these actions and their philosophical, political and social content. The artists will not only reflect on the potential themes raised by the various components of the pieces, but will offer a broader reflection on contemporary ways of understanding memory and the notions of authenticity, fiction and forgery.

Avec/with Linda Fregni Nagler, Mark Geffriaud, Invernomuto, Jeroen Kooijmans, Irene Kopelman, Benoît Maire, Diego Marcon, Clément Rodzielski, Roma Publications, Batia Suter, Richard Sympson & Raphaël Zarka.

11 janvier – 29 janvier 2011
Fondation d’entreprise Ricard, Paris

Posted in Art

Signal:Noise

December 21st, 2010

Signal:Noise is an experimental cross-disciplinary research project that aims to explore the influence of cybernetics and information theory on contemporary cultural life by testing out its central idiom, ‘feedback’, through debates, performances, and events.

Through the application of mechanical and scientific models for the understanding of social and political life, cybernetic theory – in particular notions of feedback – informed the development of many early conceptual and participatory artistic practices in the 1960s/70s, yet its influence is still under-recognized. Signal:Noise aims to bring together people who are working with these ideas in the fields of art, design, architecture and theory in order to re-open discussion around this discourse, looking at how it has informed cultural, social and political life, in the past and present.

The project is lead by Steve Rushton, Dexter Sinister (David Reinfurt and Stuart Bailey), Marina Vishmidt, Rod Dickinson and Emily Pethick.

13-16 January 2011
THE SHOWROOM, London

IIDKWIGBITWTBT SYMPOSIUM – Daniel van der Velden/Metahaven, Design for Wikileaks

December 19th, 2010

Metahaven/Daniel van der Velden evoked the research elements they took in consideration for the Wikileaks design identity proposal:
- the massive impact of the connected aspects of the subject: the Press and Technical issues
- the surrealistic current logo
- the “leaking” idea
- more than Wikileaks, it’s about a specific mentality of radical transparency
- the emotional image of Wikileaks with regard to Assange justice problems
- Wikileaks complex architecture
- Networks & boundaries
New: The Poster Leaks, 193 posters (A4, pdf), Sovereign States for WikiLeaks
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Metahaven (Daniel van der Velden & Vinca Kruk) is a studio for critical graphic design with a focus on identity and branding, based in Amsterdam. From research projects, such as the Sealand Identity Project (2004), Museum of Confl ict (2006), and Quaero (2007), the group has moved into installation making and speculative design projects, such as Stadtstaat (Künstlerhaus Stuttgart and Casco Utrecht, 2009). Metahaven also produces commissioned work for clients, such as the Antennae paperback series for publishing house Valiz. Metahaven’s work has been included in numerous group exhibitions. Their book Uncorporate Identity was published in 2010 by Lars Müller.
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Manystuff: As far as you are concerned, as a contemporary graphic designer aware of this actual problematic of redefinition of design, if you wanted to leave a trace while this movement of change, what would it be?
Which work dynamic would you like to bring to the next generation? which attitude? What the new generation should learn? Which positioning they should remember?

Metahaven: “We don’t have a formula for that. If you’re doing something, there is no need for you to abandon all that you know just to embrace ‘change’. We like to expand by inclusion. The idea is dialogue. As we’ve said in the talk, there are two important dialogues we explore. One is the dialogue with software engineers. Apart from being on the street or at home or in bars or museums, or libraries or at our parents or in school or in stations, or in shops, or in the battlefield, or up in the sky, or wherever we spend our time, we are often behind the computer, and when there, we spend a lot of time interacting with social networking platforms like Twitter. We are great admirers of Twitter, but we are a little puzzled by their logo. There’s ideas about being likeable and transparent, definitely more interesting than Facebook’s but a long way from what many European designers still get taught identity should look like. It is important to start a dialogue with the human-computer interaction design paradigm that Twitter represents, and of course with the people who make it. We are always into politics, and Twitter has, by serendipity, become a platform for political exchange and debate—it increasingly structures political speech far beyond the soundbite, and encourages social ties beyond the comfort zone. Secondly there is the dialogue with design amateurs; people who’ve made things before a designer stepped in. We feel there is less and less of a mandate for a clean sweep, with the designer just starting from scratch. Instead you have to have a dialogue with what is there. For example, the existing WikiLeaks logo cannot be just discarded to give way to a ‘good’ logo.”

Manystuff: What about the work you are doing for WikiLeaks? what are your plan about their identity?

Metahaven: “We hope that our proposals can embody a discussion about the type of organization WikiLeaks would like to be in the future. Since our previous work on Sealand, the tiny unrecognized island state that wanted to be a data haven, we have a bit of experience in visualizing the concept of information storage in an age of control. Yet WikiLeaks is different, more complex, and more serious. We believe that there are three key elements to WikiLeaks that should be considered.
One is its ‘image economy’; the type of image you find, for example, when you Google search for WikiLeaks. In the last months, the range of faces associated with WikiLeaks has expanded to now include not just Julian Assange but a host of ‘world leaders’—Hillary Clinton condemning, Berlusconi laughing, Barack Obama, Sarah Palin, Vladimir Putin who proposed that Assange should get a Nobel Prize. We were very impressed especially by one of his attorneys, Jennifer Robinson. And there are the high profile individuals who now support Assange, like Ken Loach, Michael Moore and Jemima Khan, which would suggest a pathway to a more NGO-like format. Not to forget the face of Bradley Manning, an alleged whistleblower, and Adrian Lamo, the person who ‘turned him in’. The Manning-Lamo chat conversation that led to the arrest, would make you think that it was easy to retrieve the secrets from the military database; Manning allegedly went into the office with a recordable cd with ‘Lady Gaga’ printed on it, and while listening to her smash hit Telephone, loaded the data onto the disc, and then left. So even Lady Gaga is, by extension, part of the WikiLeaks image economy. We have kept the accusations to Assange, coming from two Swedish women, out of the identity, because as far as we can see these were interpersonal issues that were trumped and made public and juridical mainly to damage Assange.
A second element we wish to emphasize is the ‘architecture of WikiLeaks’. We’ve drawn a provisional map of it, the information of which is completely based on public sources. Yet it is quite staggering how it all seems to work. We believe an identity for WikiLeaks should reflect this architecture. To name just one example, they are hosted in various countries, or jurisdictions as we prefer to call them. WikiLeaks proposed for Iceland to become the ‘Switzerland of Bytes’ in a genius stroke of nation branding. Admirable. Iceland is by far the most interesting model for a European country politically at this moment, undergoing a political sea change as an elected bunch of 500 something of its citizens are rewriting the constitution.
Thirdly we think that a WikiLeaks identity should be about its model. There was a world before WikiLeaks and there is one after WikiLeaks. The ‘identity’ should be a projection of that world. There are now other organizations already based on the WikiLeaks model. Some have been started by ex-WikiLeaks associates like Daniel Domscheit-Berg, who initiated OpenLeaks.org. Clearly there is work to do in terms of what sort of organization a whistleblower web site is. Is it a technical switchboard inbetween whistleblower and news media? Is it a go-between NGO that does not promote any political and ideological ends but merely takes care that leaks are exposed? We clearly were attracted to WikiLeaks because of its apparent rationality, its interest in ‘scientific journalism’ that liberates reporters from the straitjacket of press briefings and corporate PR, giving them direct access to files. WikiLeaks as a telephone for change.”

Posted in Graphic Design

IIDKWIGBITWTBT SYMPOSIUM – Experimental Jetset, Still the Modern World

December 19th, 2010

Instead of a lecture, Experimental Jetset made a shirt which is a recreation (or abstraction) of the taped sweater Paul Weller is wearing on the sleeve of The Jam’s ’This is The Modern World’. The shirt comes with a small fanzine, in which we reflect on the notions of past and future in modernism.
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Experimental Jetset is an Amsterdam graphic design studio founded in 1997 by Marieke Stolk, Erwin Brinkers and Danny van den Dungen. Describing graphic design as ‘turning language into objects’, and focusing on printed matter and textual installations, Experimental Jetset have worked on projects for Stedelijk Museum CS (SMCS), Purple Institute, Centre Pompidou, Colette, Royal Dutch Mail (currently known as TNT), Réunion des Musées Nationaux (RMN), Le Cent Quatre (104), De Theatercompagnie, Musée d’Art Contemporain de Bordeaux (CAPC), Bureau Europa (NAiM) and Japanese t-shirt labels 2K/Gingham and Publik.
Their work has been featured in group exhibitions such as Terminal Five (JFK Airport, New York, 2004) and The Free Library (Riviera Gallery, New York, 2004). Solo exhibitions have included Kelly 1:1 (Casco Projects, Utrecht, 2002) and Ten Years of Posters (Kemistry Gallery, London, 2006).
In 2007, a large selection of work by Experimental Jetset has been acquired by the Museum of Modern Art (NYC), for inclusion in the MoMA permanent collection.
Between 2000 and 2009, Experimental Jetset have been teaching at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy (Amsterdam)
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Manystuff: As far as you are concerned, as a contemporary graphic designer aware of this actual problematic of redefinition of design, if you wanted to leave a trace during this movement of change, what would it be?

Experimental Jetset: “It’s interesting that you use the word ‘redefinition’, as it can mean several things. It can refer to the search for a new definition, for a new name; but ‘redefining’ can also refer to the idea of defining something again, to recognize it, to revisit it.
And it is that last meaning that we find most attractive. We think that graphic design is a very interesting subculture; it’s a time-capsule that contains all kinds of ideologies, modernist ideals, personal politics, aesthetic concepts. We like the idea of graphic design as an underground continuum, as a place where the ghosts of the past and the specters of the future intermingle, and become inseparable. We see graphic design as a worthwhile concept, as something that we would like to defend. We don’t want to see it dissolved in vague terms such as ‘visual culture’ or ‘network culture’ or ‘innovation’… We like the word ‘graphic design’ as it is, with all its historical weight and ideological baggage. In our case, ‘redefining graphic design’ would mean to recognize it, to strengthen it, to become aware of it again.”

Manystuff: Which work dynamic would you like to bring to the next generation? which attitude? What the new generation should learn? Which positioning they should remember?

Experimental Jetset: “We don’t really want to advertise one singular position; in a way, we think it is exactly the multitude of positions that makes graphic design interesting. We love the idea that each design studio represents its own position.
But if we would have to describe a position that means a lot to us personally, than we would like to quote Régis Debray. His essay ‘Socialism and Print’ (2007) meant a lot to us, and we were particularly moved by this paragraph”:
“The greatest modernizers inaugurate their career with a backward leap, and a renaissance proceeds through a return to the past, a recycling, and hence a revolution. (…) Behind the ‘re’ of reformation, republic or revolution, there is a hand flicking through the pages of a book, from the end back to the beginning. Whereas the finger that pushes a button, fast-forwarding a tape or disc, will never pose a danger to the establishment”.


Experimental Jetset studio ©Manystuff

Posted in Graphic Design

IIDKWIGBITWTBT symposium – Erik Kessels, Graphic Detour

December 19th, 2010

Erik Kessels talked about the quality of the detour in every graphic design project, how to look beyond, bypass the original question.
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Erik Kessels is founder and Creative Director of KesselsKramer, an independent international communications agency located in Amsterdam and London. Kessels works and has worked for national and international clients such as Nike, Diesel, Oxfam, Ben, Vitra, and The Hans Brinker Budget Hotel, for which he has won numerous international awards. Kessels is a photography collector and has published several books of vernacular images through KesselsKramer Publishing – including the in almost every picture series. Since 2000, he has been one of the editors of the alternative photography magazine Useful Photography. In 2010 he won the cultural prize from the city of Amsterdam.
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Manystuff: If you want to leave a mark as a graphic designer, what would it be?

Erik Kessels: “Disciplines are getting more democratic and accessible. For the first time, almost everyone has access to the technology that makes designing relatively easy.
As a result, we’re surrounded by ever increasing numbers of graphic designers.
The only way to stand out in this crowd is to work from a good idea. Without an idea, design becomes wallpaper: sometimes pretty but ultimately left in the background. As more and more “design-like-wallpaper” heaps up, the value of ideas can only increase. After all, if computers are a shortcut around craft skills, the only point of difference left is thinking.”

Manystuff: Do you think that diverting/deviating/looking at beyond is the key of the redefinition of design today?

Erik Kessels: “Sure, deviation is the redefinition of design. More than that, it’s the redefinition of creative disciplines generally. Nowadays, a graphic designer can use their skills in fashion design, architecture, visual arts, in whatever field takes their interest. And this works in the opposite direction as well: a visual artists can also take a detour and work in graphic design. This endless cross-fertilisation means that the idea of a “pure graphic designer” will become increasingly vague.”

Posted in Graphic Design

IDKWIGBITWTBT SYMPOSIUM – VARIOUS

December 19th, 2010

Wim Crouwel launched the day explaining that he was full of expectations as today the graphic design landscape is more complicated as it used to be.

Lust spoke about scripting defining shapes and the new possibilities of coding. He explored the code esthetic used by designers, architects, visual artists…He finished with the use of code for language analysis.

DJ Spooky (Paul D. Miller) spoke about graphic design from a musical perspective.

Stefan Sagmeister talked about how he can be happier as a designer, which factors influence his well-being. And possibly, if he can design something that might increase the well being of an audience.

Posted in Graphic Design

IDKWIGBITWTBT SYMPOSIUM – THOMAS LOMMEE/INTRASTRUCTURES, Thinking inside the box

December 19th, 2010

Intrastructures
Interests = process, meaning & context.
Language = graphic design.
Method: open design, network.
Goal: sustainability.
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Intrastructures is a pragmatic utopian design studio that generates models, tools and products for social and environmental restoration.
“We translate emerging opportunities into products and services that are profitable, ecological and equitable.
Observation, analysis and synthesis drive our thinking process.
Collaboration, prototyping and publications enable us to test, refine and realize our ideas.”

Posted in Graphic Design

IDKWIGBITWTBT symposium – Alice Rawsthorn, What’s going on? Design today

December 19th, 2010

Alice Rawsthorn evokes the new challenges of the graphic designers in the economic, political & social complex system they evolve in.
One of these challenges: Identify sustainability in this severe environment. Which means various problematics & answers, also contradictions… the future of graphic designer seems to be doubting, confusing & chaotic.
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Alice Rawsthorn is the Design Critic of the International Herald Tribune and a columnist for the New York Times Magazine. Her columns are syndicated to other media worldwide. A prominent broadcaster and public speaker on design, Rawsthorn is a trustee of Arts Council England and the Whitechap- el Gallery in London, and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Agenda Council on Design.
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Manystuff: Which is the significant movement & attitude in contemporary graphic design that have made change in the field of graphic design?

Alice Rawsthorn: “It’s a boringly predictable answer to the question, but the explosion of data visualization is undoubtedly one of the most exciting new developments not only in graphic design but every area of design. One of the (many) great things about design is its ability to constantly invent – and reinvent – solutions to urgent problems. The role of data visualization in helping us to make sense of information overload at a time when more data is being generated at greater speed, on a greater scale and at greater complexity than ever before is a fantastic example of design ingenuity that makes millions of people’s lives easier, more enjoyable and more efficient.”

Manystuff: What the new generation should learn from the recent history of graphic design? Which positioning, engagement they should remember?

Alice Rawsthorn: “One of the strands of graphic design history (recent and less recent) that I find most appealing is its role in helping us to navigate the world, and to make sense of what’s happening around us. There are so many great examples to learn from. The technology may have changed but the underlying principles of clarity and intellectual rigor haven’t. If you look at the impact of Booth’s Poverty Maps in exposing the plight of the poor and the extent of hardship in 1880s London, they have exactly the same impact as the most powerful data visualizations today.”

Posted in Graphic Design

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