October 27th, 2015

‘In the early 1960s, I had the good fortune of meeting a lot of artists. Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, John Cage, Trisha Brown and Carolee Schneeman. These artists and painters were the real influence on me, as a poet. Whether it was a performance or a painting, they did what arose in their minds, and made it happen. It occurred to me that poetry was seventy five years behind painting and sculpture and dance and music. I said to myself, if these artists can do it, why can’t I do it for poetry?’ John Giorno

UGO RONDINONE : I LOVE JOHN GIORNO – until January 10, 2016, Palais de Tokyo, Paris – is the first retrospective of the life and work of the American poet John Giorno (born 1936, lives and works in New York), a key figure of the American underground scene of the 1960s. The exhibition is conceived by Swiss artist Ugo Rondinone (born 1964, lives and works in New York) as a work in its own right. ‘I structured the exhibition in eight chapters, each representing a layer of Giorno’s multifaceted work. Taken as a whole, they reflect how he works and help us to understand the dual influences that American culture and Buddhism had on his life and art,’ Rondinone explains.

Giorno was an iconic character in Andy Warhol’s early films who found inspiration in the appropriation of found images by Pop artists and captured the real-life colloquial language of advertisements, television, newspapers and street slang. A leading figure in the lineage of the Beat Generation, he revived the genre of ‘found poetry’ and worked to make poetry accessible to all.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions

VOL. XVI – Haris Epaminonda

September 22nd, 2015

The work of the Cyprus-born artist Haris Epaminonda, who currently lives and works in Berlin, comprises films, sculptures and installations that incorporate images and objects borrowed from various origins and epochs, staging multiple encounters, while cultivating an explicit relationship with the past. Pages of old books, vases or statuettes are put into relation through visual associations that form a fictional space.
For the exhibition VOL. XVI at le plateau in Paris, September 24 to December 6, the artist has devised an all-encompassing environment that occupies the cleared spaces with a series of cubicles, platforms and screens conceived both as sculptures and presentation devices. Including other elements, films and sound, the whole set exceeds the exhibition space itself with parallel and temporary appearances connecting the inside and outside of le plateau, shaping a kind of inhabited archipelago in constant evolution. By condensing the different angles of her approach, in which the idea of travelling and movement – in time and in space – plays a fundamental role, the exhibition as a whole will offer a unique opportunity for a simultaneously sculptural, spatial and filmic experience.

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Take me (I’m Yours)

September 9th, 2015

Take Me (I’m Yours) is a collective and interactive exhibition which brings together the work of forty-four international artists under the curatorship of Christian Boltanski, Hans Ulrich Obrist and Chiara Parisi. The exhibition, from September 16 to November 8, will turn the Monnaie de Paris’s 18th-century rooms into a venue for free and creative exchange, designed to unsettle the conventional relationship between a work of art and its viewer. Visitors are invited, even encouraged, to touch, use and take away the artists’ projects and ideas.
The exhibition curators, Christian Boltanski and Hans Ulrich Obrist, have taken the original principle which motivated them in 1995 at the Serpentine Gallery and brought it up to date.
With more than forty projects, the Paris exhibition is greater in magnitude and scope. The project sees the return of artists who took part in the first event (Christian Boltanski, Maria Eichhorn, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Jef Geys, Gilbert & George, Douglas Gordon, Christine Hill, Carsten Höller, Fabrice Hyber, Wolfgang Tillmans, Lawrence Weiner and Franz West), and has given rise to new collaborations (Etel Adnan & Simone Fattal, Pawel Althamer, Kerstin Brätsch & Sarah Ortmeyer, James Lee Byars, Heman Chong, Jeremy Deller, Andrea Fraser, Gloria Friedmann, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Bertrand Lavier, Jonathan Horowitz, Koo Jeong-A, Alison Knowles, Angelika Markul, Gustav Metzger, Otobong Nkanga, Roman Ondák, Yoko Ono, Philippe Parreno, Sean Raspet, Takako Saito, Daniel Spoerri, Rirkrit Tiravanija, Amalia Ulman, Franco Vaccari, Danh Võ and the artists Ho Rui An, Felix Gaudlitz and Charlie Malgat from 89plus, the multiplatform international research project designed to map the generation born on and after 1989 by Hans Ulrich Obrist and Simon Castets. The exhibition is also an outlet for distributing issues of point d’ironie (agnès b.).
Displayed on the walls of the last factory in the centre of Paris, the exhibition is an opportunity to revisit the myth of the unique artwork and question its methods of production.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions


August 31st, 2015

Scroll down and keep scrolling – October 10, 2015, to January 17, 2016, Ikon Gallery, Birmingham – is the most comprehensive exhibition of Fiona Banner’s work to date, re-presenting key early projects alongside recent and unseen works that span a period of 25 years. “It is not a survey – more of an anti-survey,” says the artist, “A survey suggests something objective, historical, and fixed. This is subjective; nothing else is possible.” Throughout the exhibition Banner revisits her work with intensity and humor.

Publishing is central to Banner’s practice and she often produces books through her own imprint The Vanity Press. For the artist the act of publishing is itself performative, and this exhibition at Ikon will display a wide archive of previously unseen publications and ephemera. In addition, the artist will also publish a major new book to accompany the exhibition, typeset in a new font created by the artist and entitled Font. Font is an amalgamation of typefaces Banner has worked with previously, and will be used throughout the museum for the duration of Banner’s show.

From September 18 to October 31, 2015, Font will also be on view at Frith Street Gallery in London, and will be available to download on from 17 September.

No Reading No Cry!

August 24th, 2015

No Reading No Cry! – September 5 to 30, 2015, Open Graphic Art Studio – Museum of the City of Skopje, Macedonia – is an exhibtion curated by Mark Pezinger Verlag with Darko Aleksvoski, Felicia Atkinson, Andrew Gannon, Romain Gandolphe, Katrin Herzner, Florence Jung, Florian Köhler, Mikko Kuorinki, Darko Petrusev, Astrid Seme, Yann Vanderme and the Macedonian Artists’ Books Library*

“I’m never stocking them again, never! It’s been bedlam! I thought we’d seen the worst when we bought two hundred copies of the Invisible Book of Invisibility. Cost a fortune, and we never found them.“ This is how the manager of Flourish and Blotts, the bookstore in the book/film “Harry Potter” complains about the “Invisible Book of Invisibility”. This book about the power of invisibility is itself, of course, invisible. As manager of a bookstore invisibility is indeed frustrating, but from an artist’s perspective invisibility can encourage the viewer to re-imagine how we engage presence, memories or documentation. Following this idea Mark Pezinger Verlag brings 11 artists together that work along the margins of what a book is, how the book and its content disappear and when it can only be visualized through imagination.

As a physical counterpart to the exhibition the Macedonian Artists’ Books Library brings together artist’s books from various publishers that are normally hard to be accessible in Macedonia. With 1:1, 1%ofOne Verlag, Back Bone Books, Ben K. Voss, Black Pages, BoaBooks, Edition Fink, Edition Taube, FuckingGoodArt, Gloria Glitzer, Harpune Verlag, Good Press Gallery, Humboldt Books, Kodoji Press, La Houle, Michalis Pichler Unlimited, More Publisher, Nieves, Section7Books, Sergej Vutuc, Shelter Press and Soybot.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

Corita Kent and the Language of Pop

August 19th, 2015

Corita Kent was an activist nun who juxtaposed spiritual, pop cultural, literary, and political writings alongside symbols of consumer culture and modern life in order to create bold images and prints during the 1960s. Also known as Sister Mary Corita, Kent is often seen as a curiosity or an “anomaly” in the pop art movement.
Corita Kent and the Language of Pop – September 3 to January 3, 2016 at Harvard Art Museums, Cambridge, and February 13 to May 8, 2016, at San Antonio Museum of Art – positions Kent and her work within the pop art idiom, showing how she is an innovative contemporary of Andy Warhol, Ed Ruscha, and other pop art icons. The exhibition also expands the current scholarship on Kent’s art, elevating the role of her artwork by identifying its place in the artistic and cultural movements of her time.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions

Orange Export Ltd.

June 26th, 2015

Authors don’t write books. They write on pages or on screens, but not the ones readers will hold. Their texts need proofreaders, editors, typographers, graphic designers, paper makers, printers, binders, as well as softwares, presses, and other machines before they become books. Yet sometimes, authors do make books. Maybe this doesn’t seem so unusual today, and it has become harder to understand what it means for a text to pass from the body of the author to that of the composer setting up letters and characters, and to leave the world of language for the space of the sheet of paper. There’s a world of difference when the hand that writes also prints and the materiality of the text measures itself to the surface of the page, inscribing, covering, scratching, cutting into it.

Between the early 1970s and the mid 1980s, Orange Export Ltd. was a peculiar adventure in French publishing, where such an experiment was conducted. Raquel, who was first of all a painter, and Emmanuel Hocquard first decided to publish a book together, Le Portefeuil using silkscreen. Then they developed their imprint with a group of poets, writers and artists – friends who gathered in Raquel’s house, in the suburbs of Paris. Her studio became the workshop where the books were made, meaning: conceived, written, typeset, printed and bound, by hand, by Hocquard himself. A few copies at a time.

What’s left from that enterprise is not only an impressive collection of titles – in which feature almost the whole French poetry scene of the 1970s and early 1980s. It’s also a way of conceiving books through their making; and a passion for this physical process so strong that we end up wondering: what if this was the production line of happiness? How far are the pragmatics of publishing and the dynamics of friendship related? How to deal with a public, when you know you can only print 9 copies of a book a day? If, as Hocquard wrote, printing books meant learning again how to write, should we now, connecting Orange Export Ltd. to our screens and keyboards, learn again how to read? On view from June 26, at at castillo/corrales, Paris.

Posted in Books, Exhibitions

Constellating Images

June 11th, 2015

Luis Jacob, Album VI.

After collage, the archive, and appropriation, the Villa du Parc, Annemasse, is devoting its summer exhibition, Constellating Images, from June 25 to September 20, to art practices that arrange images in constellations, images that are of different natures, provenances and periods. Appearing on the art scene in the first decade of this century, these practices are contemporaneous with the development of the internet, which has made an exponential access to images and a dehierarchized navigation possible thanks to search engines that reference and classify large bodies of information through keywords. And while similarities between the techno- logical tool (used daily) and artmaking can be seen, the choice of images in these works springs from a sensitive, differentiating selection and approach. The artists situate certain images within a multitude of signs and work to lend meaning and form to their particular grouping. Thus, from the continuous flow of images they strive to transpose, use, redefine, and extract plastic, material, and often tangible forms that are specific to contemporary art (paintings, video, installation, etc.)…

With artworks by Luis Jacob, Ryan Gander, Aurélien Froment, Alexandra Leykauf, Benoit Maire, Jonathan Monk, Sara VanDerBeek; with “The Infinite Library” by Haris Epaminonda and Daniel Gustav Cramer, and “Unpacking my Library, (re)composition” by Christophe Daviet-Thery.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture

May 17th, 2015

Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture, from June 27, 2015, to March 6, 2016, MoMA, New York, considers the single-family home and archetypes of dwelling as a theme for the creative endeavors of architects and artists. Through drawings, photographs, video, installations, and architectural models drawn from MoMA’s collection, the exhibition highlights how artists have used the house as a means to explore universal topics, and how architects have tackled the design of residences to expand their discipline in new ways.
The exhibition also marks the 50th anniversary of the death of Viennese-born artist and architect Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965). Taking its name from an unrealized project by Kiesler, Endless House celebrates his legacy and the cross-pollination of art and architecture that made Kiesler’s 15-year project a reference point for generations to come.

Linus Bill + Adrien Horni – Gemälde 2015

May 10th, 2015

In a time of previously unforeseen plurality, visibility and distribution, the value of the image has been elevated in its usefulness as a tool and simultaneously annihilated by its ease of multiplication and impossibility of ownership. Linus Bill & Adrien Horni seize this moment to reestablish the foundations and hierarchy of the image.
To create their raw material, they incorporate tools both analogue and digital – paper, scissors, glue, Xerox, scanner, iPhones, iPad and powerbooks, consumer printers, architectural printers and hi-end inkjet alike. Even if beginning on paper, these sketches soon become jpegs.
Eschewing the art world’s conscientious formula for creation / documentation / distribution, the artists approach their own process more like mail-order shopping. Flipping the idea of the catalogue on its head, Bill and Horni put the exhibition catalogue before the artwork, chronologically at least. The printed catalogue always precedes the works destined for the walls of the gallery or institution. The artists state that “The books are like catalogues from which we choose our next painting.”
The artist’s new book, their largest to date, Gemälde 2013 – 2017, (the years depict both the time frame of the source material and period to complete the paintings) is the foundation for the exhibition Gemälde 2015 at Galerie Allen in Paris, May 28 to July 26.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions

Exercises in Seating – Max Lamb

April 12th, 2015

Exercises in seating is a project by Max Lamb. From April 12 to 19 in Milano, the exhibition of furnitures will illustrate Max Lamb’s continuous examination of his material landscape and manifold modes of production. The accompanying publication is published by Dent-de-Leone.

Posted in Art, Books, Design, Exhibitions

Marcel Broodthaers: Musée d’Art Moderne – Département des Aigles

April 12th, 2015

Marcel Broodthaers est un artiste polymorphe, poète, plasticien, réalisateur de films, photographe, qui a anticipé la réflexion sur les rapports entre l’œuvre d’art, le musée et le public.
Le Musée d’Art Moderne – Département des Aigles, à laquelle l’exposition à la Monnaie de Paris – du 18 avril au 5 juillet 2015 – est dédiée, s’inscrit dans le contexte de 1968 en Europe, marqué par la réflexion sur les changements de la société, de l’art et de ses institutions. Malgré lui, Marcel Broodthaers en devient l’un des acteurs majeurs. Il s’autoproclame “directeur” et “conservateur” du Musée d’Art Moderne – Département des Aigles, institution qui, durant quatre ans, entre 1968 et 1972, va interroger la valeur de l’œuvre d’art en soit et dans son contexte d’exposition. Un questionnement de la notion de musée et de son rôle que Broodthaers fait passer entre le ton de la fiction et de la réalité.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions


April 9th, 2015

Four Eggs Theory is an exhibition – until May 10, Futura, Prague – and a book by Honza Zamojski. In an ideal world an ideal egg would be an ideally oval geometrical form with an ideally spherical yolk center surrounded by whites. After boiling our specimen and cutting it crossways, we would see a microscale model of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun. Both systems – the cosmic one and the human one – are closed and complementary, as the vitality of one of the parts depends on the other. Meanwhile, the space between the surface of the yolk and the shell, on a cosmic scale, is the sphere of influence between our planet its closest star. In the “Four Eggs Theory”1 the key element of illustrations is a synthetic image of half an egg – a closed system with a core and a surrounding atmosphere. This theory aims to describe an individual, though also, from a wider perspective, the cyclical and recurring process of the artistic creation of a Work. The Work is the key element of artistic Practice. At the same time, the theory described in the following text could be analyzed through an illustrating diagram. If we were to seek an analogy in our common knowledge, we ought to ask: Which came first, the chicken or the egg? …

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

The whole world, up to today

April 1st, 2015

©Hans Peter Feldmann, “Untitled”, 1976, 1976. Offset lithographie, coll. Frac Nord-Pas-de-Calais, vue d’exposition à la Villa du Parc, CAC Annemasse, photographie Aurélien Mole – Batia Suter, “Seat”, slideshow + chair, 2014, courtesy l’artiste, vue d’exposition à la Villa du Parc, CAC Annemasse, photographie Aurélien Mole.

The whole world, up to today explores, until May 30 at Villa du Parc, Annemasse, the use of the archive in contemporary art.
The constitution of archives and their presentation in museums began to appear in the art of the 1960s, taking the form of dispositifs (apparatuses) and installations, often on a monumental scale. Such works are based on the accumulation of homogenous documents whose singularity recedes behind the system in which they partake. Rather than highlighting novelty or the emancipatory virtues of the image – as in the case of collage before the war – the ambition of these works is, on the contrary, to reveal the unchanging features of our representations (stereotyped poses, banal motifs, etc.) and to emphasize their value as memorial and societal indicators…

With artworks by The Atlas Group, Bernd et Hilla Becher, Christian Boltanski, Frédéric Bruly Bouabré, Gérard Collin-Thiebault, Hanne Darboven, documentation céline duval, Hans Peter Feldmann, On Kawara, Christian Marclay, Batia Suter, Oriol Vilanova, Akram Zaatari. Curated by Garance Chabert & Aurélien Mole.

Posted in Art, Exhibitions

Pliure. Epilogue (La bibliothèque, l’univers)

March 24th, 2015

©Jean-Luc Moulène, 2011

L’exposition Pliure est un essai sur le livre et “la somme infinie de ses possibles” (Blanchot). Elle donne à voir le potentiel du livre, en relation permanente avec le geste artistique, et de quelle façon l’art se transforme à l’épreuve du livre et le livre se transforme à l’épreuve de l’art. Dans l’exposition, le livre devient un laboratoire d’expériences esthétiques -et le canal même de ces expériences. Exposition ni rétrospective, ni historique, Pliure ne prétend pas embrasser tout un thème ou prouver une théorie mais essaie plutôt de montrer comment l’espace du livre provoque l’art.

Après le Prologue de l’exposition, les oeuvres contemporaines de l’exposition Pliure. Epilogue (La bibliothèque, l’univers), du 10 avril au 7 juin 2015 à l’École nationale supérieure des beaux-arts de Paris, s’allient notamment à une sélection d’oeuvres issues de la collection de l’école, et à un focus autour de l’éditeur Seth Siegelaub.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions


March 19th, 2015

TELLS US WE’RE NOTHING. TELLS US WE’RE EVERYTHING. FLOWS IN BETWEEN is an exploration by design & art studio RO/LU and graphic designer Dante Carlos on themes about meditation, objects, and space. March 28 to April 26, 2015, The Center for Ongoing Research & Projects, Columbus.

“RO/LU: It seemed really easy to talk to you about the connections between spirituality and art. Sometimes it makes me uneasy to talk about this because spirituality has a lot of baggage as a term? Because it’s easily conflated with religion but, it doesn’t really have anything to do with that for me. There’s not a lot of separation between meditation and the work we do. They are different but, it’s nice to explore.

DANTE: The blurrier those distinctions are, the more interesting it becomes, but that’s the Gemini in me talking. But maybe we’re both comfortable and interested in talking about it because the projects we take on bleed into each other and the way we make work absorbs all the influence around us. Why should there be a distinction between something that is productive and something that is meditative or spiritual; or distinct from the rest of the universe rather than framing a part of it?” (…)

Inventory Press – Way Station

March 16th, 2015

Inventory Press publishes books on topics in art, architecture, design, and music, with an emphasis on subcultures, minor histories, and the sociopolitical aspects of material culture.
Way Station extends the January 2015 exhibition by Shannon Harvey, Adam Michaels, and Levi Murphy at Grice Bench, Los Angeles. At once static and dynamic, the book presents a journey through a series of landscapes, juxtaposed with a steadily spinning furniture form—that of the primary exhibition component, a set of colorful benches featuring ergonomics designed to heighten and transform physical and mental awareness. The book provides a particularly associative experience for a reader seated on a Way Station bench, while maintaining interest far beyond this setting.

Posted in Art, Books, Design, Exhibitions

Frederick Kiesler: Visions at Work

February 6th, 2015

From February 11 until May 2, 2015, Tensta konsthall, Stockholm, will show Frederick Kiesler: Visions at Work an exhibition of Frederick Kiesler’s genuinely transdisciplinary work. Frederick Kiesler (1890–1965) was an architect, artist, scenographer, pedagogue, theorist and – not least – a groundbreaking exhibition designer.

From the 1920′s constructivist-inspired theater exhibitions in Vienna and Paris and the early 1930′s acclaimed shop window presentations in New York City to the legendary scenography for Peggy Guggenheim’s Manhattan gallery Art of This Century (1942) and the collaboration with Marcel Duchamp, Kiesler paved the way for a dynamic view of the art experience.
Working with the monumental ‘The Shrine of the Book’ (1965) in Jerusalem, he extracted ideas and forms from his often reproduced ‘Endless House’, a visionary bio-morphic building where, to quote Kiesler himself, ‘all the ends meet’ . Underlying much of Kiesler’s work were his thoughts on the continual interaction between man and his natural and technological environments, as defined in the theory of correalism. Although Kiesler was a member of de Stijl, a close friend and collaborator of Duchamp, André Breton, Alfred H. Barr and several other key figures in the art of the 1900′s, as well as an influential teacher at Columbia University in New York, he is something of an unknown.

The exhibition will feature models and documentations of Kiesler’s designs for exhibitions, buildings, interiors, shop-windows, etc. from various periods. The exhibition will also include prototypes, including those of his Mobile Home Library and the mass-produced so-called correalist furniture, among others. The focus will be on Kiesler’s interest in the intersection between art and life and how this manifests in his works. The artist Céline Condorelli, who has a long-time interest in exhibition design and modes of presentation, will contribute to the project.

Pliure. Prologue (La part du feu)

January 28th, 2015

The exhibition Pliure. Prologue (La part du feu) (Fold. Prologue (The share of the fire)), January 30 to April 12, Fondation Calouste Gulbenkian, Paris, explores the significance of the book and “the infinite sum of its possibilities” (Blanchot). What can occur to a book when it is in permanent relation with an artistic gesture? How is art transformed in dialogue with a book and how is a book transformed by art? On these occasions, the book becomes a laboratory for aesthetic experiences, while leading towards such experiences by its very essence. This exhibition does not aim to be retrospective, historical, or to function as an anthology. Pliure does not claim to embrace an entire theme or to prove a definitive theory but it attempts to show how the realm of books has provoked art and continues to do so. The term “pliure” (fold) refers in part to an action (and even to a specific function in a former printing factory), but also to the trace left by this action and therefore to the fold or the crease this action imprints on the paper. As such, the fold synthesizes the act of doing and what has been done, it is at once a memory and the consequence of a gesture. With the fold, the book has two possibilities: it opens or it closes, reveals or hides. Thanks to the fold, something unexpected is the other side of the page and this is the characteristic mystery of the book.

The exhibition bring together approximately 40 works dating from the 16th to the 21st centuries: films, sculptures, installations, paintings and rare books, by Helena Almeida, Christian Boltanski, Lewis Carroll, Lourdes Castro, Geoffrey Chaucer, Rui Chafes, Claude Closky, d’Alembert, Raffaella della Olga, Diderot, Dürer, Marcel Duchamp, Olafur Eliasson, Hans-Peter Feldmann, Robert Filliou, Jean-Luc Godard, John Latham, Sol LeWitt, Richard Long, René de Lorraine, William Morris, Bruce Nauman, Alain Resnais, Ed Ruscha, Dayanita Singh, Michael Snow, François Truffaut, Maria Helena Vieira da Silva, Wolf Vostell, Lawrence Weiner and Francesca Woodman.
Pliure questions and enlarges our traditional perception of books and artworks, imbued with the strong belief that, as Mallarmé would say, “there is no explosion but a book.”

The ENSBA will receive the second part of this exhibition. Pliure. Epilogue (la bibliothèque, l’univers), 10 April to 7 June, 2015, Palais des Beaux Arts de Paris.

Posted in Art, Books, Exhibitions

Linus Bill and Adrien Horni installation at Printed Matter

December 4th, 2014

From December 4 to January 10, at Printed Matter in New York, Swiss artists Linus Bill and Adrien Horni will present an exhibition featuring a survey of their collaborative publications, as well as a newly-created wall piece. Stemming from their desire to challenge the perceived hierarchy of artistic mediums, their practice includes an active publishing element as well as sculptures and paintings that are often mutually-derived.
Linus Bill and Adrien Horni often begin their work together with the creation of a modest publication. The small-scale collages that make up the piece are handmade with paper, scissors and glue, as well as on copy machines, scanners, and iPhones. These ‘reproductions’ serve as a catalog for a show that does not yet exist. The artists then select works to scale up and re-create as full size canvas “paintings”, fulfilling the obligation of the Artist but in reverse.
In the case of their installation at Printed Matter they have engaged a similar set of concerns, though from another vantage point. Following the creation of a new staple-bound zine catalog, they have simply excerpted an image from the publication as a laser print collage with an added sticker. By maintaining the work’s size and giving the image a new context (now in an enormous frame), they re-assign the value of artwork and make it into something that is at once both an exemplary example of a wall-worthy artwork, and that seems to undermine that suggestion at the same time. In a concurrent exhibition at Nathalie Karg Gallery (Opening December 11), the small scale collages from the publication (and the framed piece at Printed Matter) are installed as the “original“ large scale paintings.
An additional survey of publications by Turbo Magazine, Horni’s ongoing publishing project, will also be on view as part of the installation.

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